July 1st, Repeal of Proscription

July 1st celebrates the repeal of Proscription. In 1746, after the Battle of Culloden, the Parliament of Great Britain enacted Proscription to assimilate the Scottish Highlands. The Dress Act was part of this Act and made wearing the Highland Dress illegal. No Scot was allowed to wear their clan’s tartan or kilt. Over thirty years later, on July 1st 1782, the Proscription Act was repealed and Scots could once again display their tartans.

If you have Scottish anscestry, this is your day to proudly wear your clan’s tartan.

Spade Brooch
Spade Brooch

 

Celtic Brooch in Silver
Celtic Brooch in Silver

 

Celtic Brooch in Bronze
Celtic Brooch in Bronze

The Vibrancy of Northwest Art

Pacific Northwest art has a long and vibrant history. Stretching back over ten thousand years, coastal tribes created artwork based on materials that they found locally and could trade with other tribes, such as copper and shells. When Europeans moved into the area, the artwork utilized products traded from the Europeans, including iron.

At David Morgan, our traditional jewelry has been made from patterns over a hundred years old. These traditional patterns were designed by Tlingit tribes. In the early 1900’s, Mayer Brothers, a jewelry manufacturer in Seattle, produced silver bracelets to sell to the Indians along the Pacific Northwest coast. These trade bracelets became favored items to be given away at potlatches. Production has continued to this day under a succession of manufacturing companies here in the Northwest.

Lovebirds Trade Bracelet, sterling silver. Designed by Bill Wilson, made in USA.

Pacific Northwest art continues to be vibrant and innovative today. Odin Lonning, a Tlingit from Juneau, is an award-winning artist who has designed several of our jewelry pieces, including the ever-popular Raven and the Box of Daylight.

Corrine Hunt has made a tremendous impact in the art world. She is also a Tlingit/Komoyue and a member of the Raven Gwa’wina clan. She designed the medals for the 2010 Winter Olympics. We are proud to sell items from her Spirit of the Wild collection.

Corrine Hunt Deerskin Wristlet. Spirit of the Wild Collection.

We are pleased to offer a range of trade bracelets and matching rings designed by Bill Wilson, a Tlingit raised in Hoonah, Alaska. The bracelets are struck from the original dies made in the early 1900’s for trade with the Indians of the Pacific Northwest. Typical of the early patterns, the bracelets are relatively narrow, with the design on the terminals. The bracelets and rings are available in sterling silver.

Christian White carved the argillite chess pieces of which we sell the Boma reproductions. He is a Haida from the island of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia.

Please enjoy this article about Christian White from the New York Times.

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Pacific Northwest Art

 

Crosses for Easter

With Easter approaching, you may be struggling to find a unique gift. Our Celtic Crosses are rich with history that stretches back over a thousand years.

Celtic Cross Pendant

The Celtic Cross Pendant is inspired by the stone Celtic crosses found in many parts of Wales, dating from the early days of Christianity in Britain.

Muiredach’s Cross Pendant

Muiredach’s Cross of Monasterboice is an outstanding example of later period Celtic crosses, with full ornamentation on both front and back and on the sides. This small cross is a finely detailed reproduction, including edge ornamentation.

Trinity Cross Necklet

Our Trinity Cross Necklet has triskeles incised in each arm, symbolizing the Trinity in an ancient Celtic style.

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Celtic Jewelry

US Will Adopt Bison as National Mammal

The bison could soon be the national mammal of the United States. The bill, passed by the House and Senate, now awaits the signature of the President.

Supporters of the bill say it will afford overdue recognition to a species that has been of such importance to the culture and history of the US.

“No other indigenous species tells America’s story better than this noble creature,” said Rep. William Lacy Clay. “The American bison is an enduring symbol of strength, Native American culture and the boundless western wildness.”

Tens of millions of bison, also known as buffalo, once ranged across North America. A century later, only a thousand remained. Concerned citizens, including President Teddy Roosevelt, formed the American Bison Society to help relocate 15 bison from the Bronx Zoo to a refuge in Oklahoma. There the bison could begin to repopulate the West. The current number is about 30,000, with the largest population in Yellowstone National Park. Bison are considered the first major conservation success story on Earth.

“We would like all of our children to be able to see a herd of several thousand bison roaming freely across some of these areas. That is really the vision of what the American West was and could be,” said Cristian Samper, president of the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society.

Read the full story here.

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Wildlife in Bronze Jewelry